Public Urination Ordinance in Chicago

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Public Urination Ordinance in Chicago

According to DNA Info, the places you are most likely to get a ticket for public urination are “typically close to a train station, a boozy stretch of nightclubs or both.” Areas like Division and Clark and Wicker Park come to mind. These neighborhoods have a lot of bars that attract a good crowd, especially on the weekends. Couple full bladders from drinking with no public restrooms right before getting on an L train and you have a recipe for public urination tickets. Think the Addison Red Line stop after an afternoon Cubs game.

The city has an ordinance against urinating or defecating in public (Chicago Codified Ordinance 8-4-081). A violation of this ordinance can cost a defendant a fine or even time in jail.

The ordinance states that: “No person shall urinate or defecate on the public way, or on any outdoor public property, or on any outdoor private property. Except as otherwise provided in subsection (b), any person who violates this section shall be fined not less than $100.00 nor more than $500.00, or shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than five days nor more than ten days or by both such fine and imprisonment.”

So even if you are on private property but are outside, you can be given a ticket for public urination.

The ordinance goes on to state: “Any person who violates this section while within 800 feet of a parade route which is not open to traffic shall be fined not less than $500.00 nor more than $1,000.00 or shall be punished by imprisonment for not less than five days nor more than ten days or by both such fine and imprisonment.” Think about St. Patrick’s Day parades where a lot of drinking occurs, bar hopping, etc.

Oftentimes, those charged with public urination were caught after or during a night of drinking and are worried about the offense appearing in a criminal background check. While this is not a felony that may prevent your employment, it is an embarrassing piece of information to have on your record as you are searching for or starting a new job.

Furthermore, as public records become more and more available on the internet, it is possible that anyone can find information like this without even having to pay for a criminal background check.

An experienced defense attorney will be able to review the details of your case and appear on their behalf in court to negotiate a resolution. Resolutions may range from dismissal of the charge to a plea agreement to lesser charge involving a fine or community service. Information on the administrative hearing process can be found on the city’s website.

If you receive a ticket for public urination in the City of Chicago, contact Richard at Fenbert & Associates, LLC for a free consultation about how he can help you reduce your fine and keep the incident off your record.